I heard about this new technology called JSX today so I went to JSX's Introduction Page to read more about it. The first sentence said:

JSX is a JavaScript syntax extension that looks similar to XML. 

And this is where I stopped reading. We all hate XML. You can't possibly ever go on reading about this technology further if it's introduced like that. Developers hate XML and don't want to ever hear this offensive word. Every word matters when presenting to developers.

I'll be just fine not knowing what JSX is. Until next time!

Comments

January 25, 2016, 18:22

"You have a problem. You decide to use XML to solve it. Now you have two problems." :D

January 25, 2016, 18:38

Now you have a dozen problems - your entire team left, you girlfriend left you, your family no longer supports you and your boss thinks you're a moron.

David Permalink
January 25, 2016, 18:50

Developer's hate of XML is mostly dogma. It's passed around as common knowledge (by posts like this one) with no critical thought. XML is just a representation, like JSON. Some frameworks and APIs use it in a cumbersome way. When it comes down to it, we're comparing

<age>20</age>

to

{age : 20}

, which isn't enough difference to judge anything on.

January 25, 2016, 23:25

They should've just said:

JSX is a JavaScript syntax extension that looks similar to HTML. 

Everyone who was around 10 years ago remembers when every api call was XML and every response was XML and every file format was XML and everything had to be XML because XML.

No one wants to go through that again and XML is an extremely off putting word to present a technology to developers.

Imagine Stripe saying: Our API is XML driven. Stripe succeeded because no XML payment gateway nightmares.

I'm just saying that every word matters when presenting to developers.

David Permalink
January 26, 2016, 00:23

That makes sense. I agree it is poor advertising. As you say, XML does have a stink to it, so while I wouldn't avoid a framework because it used XML, I also wouldn't advertise it as a feature on my framework homepage.

I figured you were being tongue-in-cheek. I was commenting more for your readers who might take it too seriously.

Simon Permalink
January 25, 2016, 21:35

If you're dismissing a popular technology purely because the word "XML" appears in the description, it's kind of hard to take anything you say seriously. I'm simplifying a lot, but JSX looks like XML because HTML looks like XML... it's sort of an HTML templating system.

Besides, what's wrong with XML? It's a perfectly acceptable tool when not misused, and you certainly don't speak for me when you claim "Developers hate XML".

January 25, 2016, 23:32

I'm just saying it's a very developer unfriendly way to introduce a technology. Everyone who remembers nightmares when everything had to be XML just because XML was a buzzword can relate. They could've said JSX is a JavaScript syntax extension that looks similar to HTML. that would be much friendlier. No one hates HTML, but there are a lot of people who hate XML. Also see my response comment to David above.

Simon Permalink
January 26, 2016, 02:24

I really don't get where you're coming from on this. Has XML been horribly abused over the years? Sure. But for a developer to have such an aversion to XML that they reject a highly popular web framework because it has the word XML? That's pretty petty...

And yes, they could have said HTML, instead of XML. But that wouldn't be as accurate, because JSX *is* a means of embedding XML structures in your JS files... kind of like a DSL. It's just that much of that XML is an HTML dialect of it...

Seriously, it'd take you a lot less time to skim-read the React framework tutorial than to write an ill-informed blog post about your allergy to the letters "X", "M", and "L".

David Permalink
January 26, 2016, 05:46

I'd cut him some slack. It's not really a formal blog post: he's just sharing something he found funny. It's not really fair of us to jump down his throat over such a little thing – we don't even have blogs!

January 26, 2016, 11:03

Friends don't let friends use XML.

Mark Permalink
January 26, 2016, 00:04

What?? What's wrong with XML?

January 26, 2016, 11:31

XML.

January 26, 2016, 22:00

While Computer Science academics tend to love XML, all coders hate it. Why? How did this strange phenomena happened? Someone should write a novel on XML. Searching "XML" on Google Scholar returns 3.2M results; "JSON", for instance, only returns 71K.

January 27, 2016, 13:28

Because they've no idea what they're doing. They get paid for publishing useless bullshit papers and the more useless keywords they put in there the more cited they get. Free market doesn't apply to them so they can spend all their time writing about shit that doesn't matter. They'd be all be out of business if they ran their own companies like they write their publications.

February 07, 2016, 19:36

I'm not sure I agree with you. The peer review precess for academic publishing is quite harsh; it's really difficult to get useless bullshit papers approved to any serious CS conference. Also, academic research in computer science gave us a lot of cool things, including smart search engines (PageRank), the Relational Database Model, and so much more…

January 27, 2016, 19:43

Oy. Another idiot to ignore, brought to me by CodeProject.

January 27, 2016, 19:47

Oops; actually it was feedspot. But in any case, all the comments here from Mr. Krumins are juvenile and idiotic.

Next.

marcos Permalink
February 04, 2016, 00:26

When you read through the first page, it doesn't look that bad. But I may not be using it, I don't have a use case for it.

Jim Wise Permalink
February 09, 2016, 19:39

This seems to be something like XML literals in Scala, not a replacement syntax for JavaScript. Seems neat enough to me.

Which said, I never bought into the general XML-hate. It's just S-Expressions, friend.

Leave a new comment

(why do I need your e-mail?)

(Your twitter handle, if you have one.)

Type the word "server_511": (just to make sure you're a human)

Please preview the comment before submitting to make sure it's OK.

Advertisements